Saturday, September 1, 2012

Color Schemes[1-2]
Art Resource

Marie-Therese Wisniowski

Preamble
This is the seventh post in the "Art Resource" series, specifically aimed to construct an appropriate knowledge base in order to develop an artistic voice in ArtCloth.

Other posts in this series are:
Glossary of Terms
Units Used in Dyeing and Printing of Fabrics
Occupational, Health & Safety
A Brief History of Color
The Nature of Color
Psychology of Color
Color Schemes
The Naming of Colors
The Munsell Color Classification System
Methuen Color Index and Classification System
The CIE System
Pantone - A Modern Color Classification System
Optical Properties of Fiber Materials
General Properties of Fiber Polymers and Fibers - Part I
General Properties of Fiber Polymers and Fibers - Part II
General Properties of Fiber Polymers and Fibers - Part III
General Properties of Fiber Polymers and Fibers - Part IV
General Properties of Fiber Polymers and Fibers - Part V
Protein Fibers - Wool
Protein Fibers - Speciality Hair Fibers
Protein Fibers - Silk
Protein Fibers - Wool versus Silk
Timelines of Fabrics, Dyes and Other Stuff
Cellulosic Fibers (Natural) - Cotton
Cellulosic Fibers (Natural) - Linen
Other Natural Cellulosic Fibers
General Overview of Man-Made Fibers
Man-Made Cellulosic Fibers - Viscose
Man-Made Cellulosic Fibers - Esters
Man-Made Synthetic Fibers - Nylon
Man-Made Synthetic Fibers - Polyester
Man-Made Synthetic Fibers - Acrylic and Modacrylic
Man-Made Synthetic Fibers - Olefins
Man-Made Synthetic Fibers - Elastomers
Man-Made Synthetic Fibers - Mineral Fibers
Man Made Fibers - Other Textile Fibers
Fiber Blends
From Fiber to Yarn: Overview - Part I
From Fiber to Yarn: Overview - Part II
Melt-Spun Fibers
Characteristics of Filament Yarn
Yarn Classification
Direct Spun Yarns
Textured Filament Yarns
Fabric Construction - Felt
Fabric Construction - Nonwoven fabrics
A Fashion Data Base
Fabric Construction - Leather
Fabric Construction - Films
Glossary of Colors, Dyes, Inks, Pigments and Resins
Fabric Construction – Foams and Poromeric Material
Knitting
Hosiery
Glossary of Fabrics, Fibers, Finishes, Garments and Yarns
Weaving and the Loom
Similarities and Differences in Woven Fabrics
The Three Basic Weaves - Plain Weave (Part I)
The Three Basic Weaves - Plain Weave (Part II)
The Three Basic Weaves - Twill Weave
The Three Basic Weaves - Satin Weave
Figured Weaves - Leno Weave
Figured Weaves – Piqué Weave
Figured Fabrics
Glossary of Art, Artists, Art Motifs and Art Movements
Crêpe Fabrics
Crêpe Effect Fabrics
Pile Fabrics - General
Woven Pile Fabrics
Chenille Yarn and Tufted Pile Fabrics
Knit-Pile Fabrics
Flocked Pile Fabrics and Other Pile Construction Processes

The Glossary of Terms, Timelines of Fabrics, Dyes and Other Stuff, A Fashion Data Base, Glossary of Colors, Dyes, Inks, Pigments and Resins, Glossary of Fabrics, Fibers, Finishes, Garments and Yarns and Glossary of Art, Artists, Art Motifs and Art Movements have been updated in order to better inform your art practice.

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Color Schemes
There are a number of concepts about color organization but none that will make you a good colorist. Color schemes are descriptions of color relationships, not formulae for using color well. In other words, they are color plans that involve in-built restrictions.

Color schemes are based on the traditional color wheel.

Below are the most common color schemes - beginning with the simplest.


Monochromatic Color Scheme

The monochromatic color scheme uses variations in lightness and saturation (intensity) of a single color; that is, it is a color scheme using (variations of) the one hue.

This scheme looks clean and elegant. Monochromatic colors go well together, producing a soothing effect. The monochromatic scheme is very easy on the eyes, especially with blue or green hues.


Analogous Color Scheme

The analogous color scheme uses colors that are adjacent to each other on the color wheel. For example, blue-violet, violet and red-violet.

Each row yields "Analogous Colors".

One color is used as a dominant color while others are used to enrich the scheme. The analogous color scheme is similar to the monochromatic scheme, but offers more nuances.


Complementary Color Scheme

The complementary color scheme consists of two colors that are opposite each other on the color wheel; that is, they are opposed optically such as red-green, yellow-violet and blue-orange (see figure below).

This scheme looks best when you place a warm color against a cool color; for example, a red versus green-blue. This scheme is intrinsically high-contrast. Note: Placing a red near a green makes the colors at the shared edge appear more intense; that is, the red appears redder and the green appears greener at the shared edge. This is termed a simultaneous contrast.


Split Complementary Color Scheme

The split complementary color scheme is a variation of the standard complementary color scheme. It uses a color and the two colors adjacent to its complementary. This provides high contrast without the strong tension of the complementary color scheme.

Triadic Color Scheme

The triadic color scheme uses three colors equally spaced around the color wheel.

This scheme is popular among artists because it offers strong visual contrast while retaining harmony and color richness. The triadic color scheme is not as contrasting as the complementary scheme, but it looks more balanced and harmonious.


Tetradic (Double Complementary) Color Scheme

The tetradic (double complementary) color scheme is the most varied because it uses two complementary color pairs.

This scheme is hard to harmonize; if all four hues are used in equal amounts, the scheme may look unbalanced, so you should choose a color to be dominant or to subdue the other colors.


References:
[1] J. Fish, Designing And Printing Textiles, The Crowood Press, Ramsbury (2005).

[2] A. Kornerup and J.H. Wanscher, Methuen Handbook Of Color, Polotokens, Forlag, Copenhagen (1978).

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