Saturday, June 25, 2011

In Pursuit of Complex Cloth:
Printing Approaches Workshop
On Felted And Silk Fibers

Tutor: Marie-Therese Wisniowski

Preamble
This blogspot exhibits many of my students outputs from a variety of workshops. There are one, two and five day workshops as well as workshops that have a different focus. Nevertheless, it always surprises me how much I learn from my students and how enthusiastic they are to learn and so for your convenience, I have listed the workshop posts below.

The University of Newcastle Multi-Media Course
The University of Newcastle (Newcastle and Ourimbah Campuses, NSW, Australia) 2008 to 2010.

One and Two Day Disperse Dye Workshops
Various Textile Groups (Australia) 2008 - 2011.

Five Day Workshop - In Pursuit of Complex Cloth
“Wrapt in Rocky” Textile Fibre Forum Conference (Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia) 29th June to 5th July 2008.

Five Day Workshop – In Pursuit of Complex Cloth
Orange Textile Fiber Forum (Orange, NSW, Australia) 19th to 25th April 2009.

5 Day Workshop – In Pursuit of Complex Cloth
Geelong Fiber Forum (Geelong, Victoria, Australia) 27th September to 3rd October 2009.

Two Day Workshop - Deconstructed and Polychromatic Screen Printing
Beautiful Silks (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia) 20th to 21st March 2010.

Five Day Workshop – Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
“Wrapt in Rocky” Biennial Textile Forum/Conference Program (Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia) 25th June to 1st July 2010.

Two Day Workshop – In Pursuit of Complex Cloth
ATASDA (Sydney, NSW, Australia) 28th to 29th August 2010.

Two Day Workshop – In Pursuit of Complex Cloth (Day One)
”Stitching and Beyond” Textile Group (Woodbridge, Tasmania, Australia) 2nd to 3rd October 2010.

Two Day Workshop – In Pursuit of Complex Cloth (Day Two)
”Stitching and Beyond” Textile Group (Woodbridge, Tasmania, Australia) 2nd to 3rd October 2010.

Advance Silk Screen Printing
Redcliffe City Art Gallery Redcliffe, Queensland, Australia) 10th April 2011.

One Day Workshop - In Pursuit of Complex Cloth
The Victorian Feltmakers Inc. (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia) 14th May 2011.

Five Day Workshop – Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
SDA (Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA) 13th to 17th June 2011.

Five Day Disperse Dye Master Class – Barbara Scott
Art Quill Studio (Arcadia Vale, NSW, Australia) 15th to 19th August 2011.

Five Day Workshop – Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
Fiber Arts Australia (Sydney, NSW, Australia) 26th September to 1st October 2011.

One Day Workshop – Improvisational Screen Printing
Newcastle Printmakers Workshop Inc. (Newcastle, NSW, Australia) 5th November 2011.

One Day Workshops – Low Relief Screen Printing
Various classes within Australia.

Two Day Workshop – Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
ATASDA (Sydney, NSW, Australia) 23rd to 24th June 2012.

MSDS Demonstration at Zijdelings
(Tilburg, The Netherlands) October, 2012.

Five Day Workshop - Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
Fibre Arts@Ballarat (Ballarat, Victoria, Australia) 6th to 12th April 2013.

Two Day Workshop - Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
EFTAG (Tuross Head, NSW, Australia) 13th to 14th April 2013.

Two Day Workshop - Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
Zijdelings Studio (Tilburg, The Netherlands) 9th to 10th October 2014.

PCA - Celebrating 50 Years in 2016
Art Quill Studio 2016 Workshop Program.

Image Dreamings: Basic Silk Screen Printing Workshop - Part I
2016 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).

Image Dreamings: Basic Silk Screen Printing Workshop - Part II
2016 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).

In Pursuit of: Improvisational Screen Printing Workshop
2016 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).

In Pursuit of: Low Relief Screen Printing (LRSP) Workshop
2016 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).

Art Quill Studio 2017 Workshop Program
2017 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).

In Pursuit of: Low Relief Screen Printing (LRSP)
2017 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).


Introduction To “Complex Cloth” Printing Information
"Complex Cloth" is created using surface design processes like dyeing, color removal and/or discharge, painting, printing and foiling on natural fibers. Layered imagery is developed using traditional printmaking methods of silkscreen printing, stamping, stenciling, lino-block printing, transfer printing, hand painting, and digital imaging to create cloth of rich visual depth and complexity.

Fibers that are commonly used for the creation of complex cloth include: cotton, silk, rayon, hemp, linen, bamboo silk and various blends and weights of these fibers. This workshop explored print imaging techniques on silk and on felt. Felt being a fiber that is not commonly printed using complex cloth processes.

To view other workshops on this blog site use - "SEARCH THIS BLOG" tool - employing keyword: workshop (without quotes).


One-Day Workshop Synopsis
This workshop was organized by Narelle Higgins, workshop co-ordinator of The Victorian Feltmakers Inc. in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

The workshop was held at the Hartwell Church Hall, Hartwell on the 15th May 2011. Olivia Beaman, Rita Caspersz, Laziza Hawkins, Heather Hillman, Marg Hogan, Judith Latham, June Paterson, Christine Smith and Gay Staurup attended the workshop.

In this one-day workshop, participants learnt how to create unique, one-of-a-kind printed fabrics and printed personalized imagery employing a variety of techniques. Using a variety of printing tools, processes, color combinations and pant media, participants were introduced to the underlying principles of color, contrast, value and scale employed in the creation of ArtCloth using fabric paints on mainly felted and some silk fibers. The workshop also explored and encouraged participants to think about the nuances of the color and design relationship via discussion and examples.

Group Photo at the Hartwell Church Hall, Hartwell, Victoria.
From back left to right: Christine Smith, Heather Hillman, Marg Hogan, Gay Staurup, June Paterson, Laziza Hawkins, Judith Latham and Olivia Beaman.
Sitting in front: Rita Caspersz.

Gay (a) Color, contrast and design study employing a patterned background and contrast motif on felt.

Gay (b). Color, scale and contrast study employing transparent and opaque fabric paints on a dark colored felt background.

Christine (a). Color, texture and design study employing color and contrast overprinting to create a softened background and contrast surface layer on felt.

Christine (b). Color, scale and contrast study employing transparent and opaque fabric paints on a deep colored felt background.

Olivia (a). Color, contrast and design study employing a patterned background and contrast motif on felt.

Olivia (b). Color, scale and contrast study employing transparent and opaque fabric paints on a dark colored felt background.

Marg (a). Color, texture and design study employing color and contrast overprinting to create a softened background and contrast surface layer on felt and embedded silk layers.

Marg (b). Color, scale and contrast study employing transparent and opaque fabric paints on a deep colored felt background.

Judy (a). Color, contrast and design study employing a patterned background and contrast motif on felt.

Judy (b). Color, scale and contrast study employing transparent and opaque fabric paints on a dark colored felt background.

Rita (a). Color, contrast and design study employing a patterned background and contrast motif on felt.

Rita (b). Color, scale and contrast study employing transparent and opaque fabric paints on a deep colored felt background.

Laziza (a). Color, texture and design study employing color and contrast overprinting to create a softened background and contrast surface layer on felt.

Laziza (b). Color, scale and contrast study employing transparent and opaque fabric paints on a dark colored felt background.

Heather (a). Color, contrast and design study employing a patterned background and contrast motif on felt.

Heather (b). Color, scale and contrast study employing transparent and opaque fabric paints on a dark colored felt background.

June (a). Color, contrast and design study employing a patterned background and contrast motif on felt.

June (b). Color, scale and contrast study employing transparent and opaque fabric paints on a deep colored felt background.

Saturday, June 18, 2011

ArtCloth from the Tiwi Islands
Art Review

Marie-Therese Wisniowski

Introduction
This article first appeared in the Summer Edition (2007) of Jane Dunnewold’s ezine – Art Cloth Quarterly – for which I was the guest editor. For other Art Reviews on this blog site use - "SEARCH THIS BLOG" tool - employing keyword: "Review".

The Art of Making ArtCloth from the Tiwi Islands
There are approximately 65 Aboriginal tribes and clans in Australia. The Tiwi people are one such clan. The word Tiwi means: “…we the chosen people”. There are approximately 2500 Tiwi speaking people living on two tropical islands, Bathurst and Melville, which are located in the North-West of Australia, just 80-100 kilometers off the coast of the city of Darwin (Australia). The Tiwi Islanders have for more than 20,000 years lived off the land and the sea. An Aboriginal land council representing the Tiwi people was established in 1978.

Tiwi Islands - Bathurst and Melville Island - off Continental Australia.

The “old” people have handed down stories of contact with Japanese “pearlers” and Portuguese slave traders. Since at least from 1650 AD Macassan (Malaysian) and Indonesian fishermen from Sulawesi visited northern Australian waters and traded with the Aboriginals for tortoise and pearl shells. In April of 1705 the Dutch landed on Melville Island. In 1788 a fleet of eleven ships under the command of Captain Phillip arrived in Botany Bay (just south of Sydney Harbor) carrying a cargo of 700 convicts to be- gin a new British colony within Aboriginal Australia. In 1818 Phillip King explored the Tiwi Islands. By 1824 the English established a settlement in Nguiu, in Melville, and a Catholic mission was established on Bathurst Island in 1911.

Tiwi art, culture and language were different from mainland Aboriginal groups, as there was little contact between them. The “Dreaming” or creation stories (Pukumani) stemmed from Mudungkala – an old blind woman who arose from the ground on Melville Island, with her three infants. She found it too large, and so created a strait to separate Melville from Bathurst. After she made them habitable she vanished. Nobody knows where she came from or, having completed her work, why she disappeared. With the death of her grandson, Jiani, the creation period came to a close, transforming the “creators” into various manifestations (animals, plants, natural forces or heavenly bodies) and establishing the cycle of daily events such as dark and light. The structure of Tiwi society is based on these stories.

The traditional form of mark making was derived from the creation and associated stories (Pukumani). On the Tiwi Islands the art of body painting for ceremony has been practiced for thousands of years. The decorative patterning of the Tiwi people is far more abstract than continental Australian Aboriginal works. It is used on tutini (graveposts or Pukumani poles) and tungas (bark baskets) to showcase an art style, iconography and ritual design specific to a clan or language group.

The traditional methods of producing the artwork of the Tiwi people centre on the distinctive Tiwi four color palette: white, yellow, red and black. The white and yellow ochre is dug from the western side of Bathurst Island. Heating yellow ochre produces red ochre.

Black is produced from charcoal. It should be noted that ochre is any of a class of natural earths (which are mixtures of hydrate oxides of iron) with various earthy materials, ranging in color from pale yellow to orange to red.

The contemporary art movements involving hand printing, dyeing or painting on fabric were introduced to Aboriginal Australia in the middle of the last century by non-Aboriginal art advisors, who organized workshops to teach these non-traditional techniques. Hence, contemporary textile markings are produced using modern fabrics, dyestuff and pigments as well as more traditional methods of coloring. Bede Tungutalum, a famous Tiwi ArtCloth artist, who draws on his Tiwi artistic traditions to produce his printed ArtCloth, observed: “It is good to show the other Australians that we can produce beautiful works of art, using white man’s techniques but doing Aboriginal way of art”.

Tiwi textiles are not underpinned with historical traditions related to production, prestige and wealth. In 1969 Tiwi Design was established at Nguiu. Initially it was set up to produce woodblock prints of totemic images (e.g. fish, bird and lizard motifs). Aboriginal artist and the founder of Tiwi Design, Bede Tungutalum, first learned design and printing in school on Bathurst Island. In 1969, after he finished school, he established a screen-printing business called Tiwi Designs with Tiwi artist Giovanni Tipungwuti at Nguiu on Bathurst Island - initially printing works on paper, and then textiles (from 1971). Run by men, between 1979 and 1988 the workshop developed a repertoire of 120 designs, which were inspired by the flora and fauna of the island and the distinctive crosshatched patterning that decorated the Pukamani or mortuary poles. Today, the print workshop takes up about a third of the total workspace making printed textiles, a cornerstone of Tiwi Design.

Some of Bede Tungatalum images are included here. His Yam design is on cotton drill. A yam is the starchy root of various climbing vines, much cultivated for food (e.g. sweet potato). The yam ceremony is important for the Tiwi Islanders, since the complete yam ceremony occurred at the close of creation time and signals the preparation of the poisonous Kulama yam as food.

Yam. Bede Tungatalum. Cotton Drill. Image courtesy of Tiwi Design.

The second image is a Snake design on cotton drill. The Tiwi Islanders hunt carpet snake. The snake may be an agent for sickness or healing. The Snake design exhibits the distinctive crosshatched patterning that decorates the Pukamani or mortuary poles and so in this instance, indicates sickness.

Snake. Bede Tungatalum. Cotton Drill. Image courtesy of Tiwi Design.

Although textiles at Tiwi Design have been predominantly the domains of male artists, there are also important female artists including Jean Baptiste Apuatimi and Natalie Tungatalum. Jean Baptiste Apuatimi is one of the most senior female artists. She was taught to create designs associated with important ceremonies and narrative by her late husband Declan Apuatimi, famous in his lifetime as a wood carver and painter. Jean Baptiste Apuatimi’s Jilamara is printed on raw silk. Jilamara is translated in English as “design” but is associated with the yoi ceremony, which is associated with body painting. The body painting imagery is used as a way of masking people’s identity so the deceased cannot reclaim the loved ones. Jilamara also decorates the tutini in honor of the dead.

Jilamara. Jean Baptiste Apuatimi. Raw Silk. Image courtesy of Tiwi Design.

The Carpet Snake by Declan Apuatimi is printed on light cotton. Large concentric circles are featured, and often appear as the main element of Tiwi painting, representing the Kulama circle or dancing ground. These circles are icons of the Tiwi spiritual belief.

Carpet Snake. Declan Apuatimi. Light Cotton. Image courtesy of Tiwi Design.

Osmond Kantilla, a master printer and senior designer at Tiwi Design, has over twenty years experience working with printed textiles. His general print practice involves using ready mixed pigment print pastes. He prints one-color designs onto pre-dyed fabrics in various colour combinations often creating a blended effect by pulling two or more colors through the screen simultaneously. He sees their role as a means of recording traditional practices that are disappearing or under threat of disappearing.

In Kantilla’s Blanket a visual language appears as a sophisticated pattern, which overlays twill and brocade fabric. The markings refer to country and kin. It is an iron pigment screen-printed on fabric 203 cm x 138 cm. On the other hand, Kantilla re-developed the design of Giovanni Tipungwuti for his textile length named Jurrukuni (Owl). It is a black screen-print on rust-red cotton, which was showcased in the Powerhouse Museum (Sydney) in 1996 and is now part of the museum’s collection.

Blanket. Osmond Kantilla. Cotton Drill. The University of Wollongong Art Collection (Australia). Image courtesy of Tiwi Design.

Jurrukuni. Osmond Kantilla. Rust-Red Cotton. Powerhouse Museum Collection (Australia). Image courtesy of Tiwi Design.

The abstract patterns and visual language of these contemporary Tiwi ArtCloth artists, demonstrates the continuing vitality of the totemic mark making, which were traditionally painted on the body, but are now translated to silk-screen designs for fabric. Their works are exhibited in galleries in Australia and internationally, preserving and promoting Tiwi culture through their visual art practice.

Saturday, June 11, 2011

Merge and Flow (Disperse Dye ArtCloth)
SDA Members Exhibition

Marie-Therese Wisniowski

Preamble
My artwork has appeared in a number of exhibitions which have been featured on this blog spot. For your convenience I have listed these posts below.

ArtCloth: Engaging New Visions (Marie-Therese Wisniowski - Curator's Talk)
Sequestration of CO2 (Engaging New Visions) M-T. Wisniowski
Codes – Lost Voices (ArtCloth Installation) M-T. Wisniowski
Unleashed: The Rise of Australian Street Art (Art Exhibition) Various Artists
The Journey (Megalo Studio) M-T. Wisniowski
Another Brick (Post Graffiti ArtCloth Installation) M-T. Wisniowski
ArtCloth Swap & Exhibition
When Rainforests Ruled (Purple Noon Art & Sculpture Gallery) M-T. Wisniowski
When Rainforests Glowed (Eden Gardens Gallery) M-T. Wisniowski
My Southern Land (Galerie 't Haentje te Paart, Netherlands) M-T. Wisniowski
The Last Exhibition @ Galerie ’t Haentje the Paart
Mark Making on Urban Walls @ Palm House (Post Graffiti Art Work)
Fleeting - My ArtCloth Work Exhibited @ Art Systems Wickham Art Gallery
My Eleven Year Contribution to the '9 x 5' Exhibition at the Walker Street Gallery & Arts Centre


Introduction
The SDA member exhibition was held in conjunction with Confluence Conference, Minneapolis, USA. The exhibition was held at the Katherine E. Nash Gallery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis Campus, Minneapolis, USA between 9th to 30th of June, 2011. Confluence the 2011 Surface Design Association Conference is presented by the Surface Design Association and the Textile Center USA.

As part of the Surface Design Association’s International Conference Confluence, SDA members were invited to submit work measuring 12" x 28" (vertical or horizontal format) for an installation showcasing innovative use of textiles.

Work using any textile technique or material includes surface design, weaving, quilting, knitting, stitching and the use of non-traditional materials.

The SDA Members' Show is an open call where all submitted work is exhibited in the show and then judged onsite for awards. The concept of the works is based on the following Conference Statement.


Confluence: The Theme Of The Conference
Just as two streams flowing together produce a mightier current,
Ideas meet and mingle, producing new shades of experience and meaning.
When time‐honored practices are viewed through the lens of new technologies,
and old materials are used in fresh ways, uncommon visions emerge, intermingle, and invite further investigation.
Confluence creates fresh patterns, etches new channels, and forges a deeper flow.
When diverse cultures and ideas intersect and then merge, our art and our world are transformed.

My ArtCloth work Warrawee was exhibited in the SDA Members Exhibition.
Note: This artwork was selected by Mary Schoeser to be included in her tome - Textiles: The Art Of Mankind, Thames & Hudson, New York (2012) Page 147.


Synopsis Of Artwork: Warrawee - Travelers Meeting Place
A junction, in the context of rail transport, is a place at which two or more rail routes converge or diverge. In the Australian bush there are sites named - “Warrawee” - indicating a favorite resting place for aboriginals to meet when on a “walk about” since they will be re-energized and re-ignited by company and moreover, by the tranquility of its surrounds.

My ArtCloth work is based on a peaceful and re-energized surrounds.


Technique
I used my signature MultiSperse Dye Sublimation (MSDS) technique, employing disperse dyes and flora on satin. For other MSDS artworks on this blog, use "SEARCH THIS BLOG" tool employing keyword - "MSDS".
Size: 12 inches (width) x 28 inches (length).

Warrawee – Travelers Meeting Place.

Warrawee - Travelers Meeting Place (full view 2).

Warrawee - Travelers Meeting Place (detail view 1).

Warrawee - Travelers Meeting Place (detail view 2).

Saturday, June 4, 2011

Low Relief Screen Printing (LRSP):
Published Technique Based Article
Embellish Magazine

Author: Marie-Therese Wisniowski

Introduction
An exciting new screen-printing technique for those who love color, texture and have a penchant for the serendipitous!

My new signature low relief screen-printing (LRSP) technique employing fabric paints has been published in the June 2011 issue of Embellish magazine No. 6 (Artwear Publications). If you would like to have a reference copy, which shows images and text of the technique, it will be available in newsagents in the first week in June until September 2011. It is also available via subscription. There are of course a lot of other great techniques in the issue as well.

Disclaimer: Marie-Therese Wisniowski, Art Quill Studio, and Art Quill & Co has no financial interest in Embellish or in any of the products mentioned in the article.

See the following link for more information: Embellish Magazine

Note: The information below is brief and so only gives a “taster” of the full article. For example, LRSP technique can be employed on most fabrics etc.


New “Low Relief Screen-Printing” (LRSP) Technique Employing Fabric Paints
Over the past few years and more recently, I have been experimenting with various improvisational screen-printing techniques using low relief texture items and so I have developed (and termed) a new signature method with respect to screen-printing low relief images using fabric paints.

Low relief texture screen-printed (LRSP) images are a non-permanent surface media producing only one print with each pass that results in a mono print series of prints. The images created have a lovely organic quality and lend themselves to interesting color combinations, which can add further interest to the textural quality of the printed works.

The technique is not too dissimilar to Kerr Grabowski’s Deconstructed Screen Printing (DSP), a printing/mono print technique that allows for a freer approach to screen-printing. She prints with thickened dyes over low relief textured surfaces; the dye is allowed to dry in the silk screen then printed onto fabric using release paste. The paste gradually dissolves the dried dye, which results in the image “deconstructing” as successive prints are being created until no more can be printed.

I have adapted this technique to enable the printing of low relief textured surfaces using fabric paint and acrylic print paste. Unlike DSP, where the thickened dye impressions dry in the screen, the fabric paint impressions cannot dry in the screen without damaging the silk screen. Fabric paints are acrylic based and dry fast. Therefore, the latter fabric paint property ensures that you can have immediate results when printing using this technique.

This is where any similarity ends between DSP and LRSP. Whilst in DSP the images breakdown and deconstruct until no image remains on the screen, in my LRSP the technique builds on previous screen colors, melding and then intermixing with the next color. The amount of prints created using LRSP technique can be endless (as long as your relief items are durable). You can print six or six hundred prints by continually changing colors with each successive print.

By incorporating interesting color combinations and items, these low relief mono prints are imbued with a painterly, multi colored, richly textured and organic aesthetic. LRSP is an exciting technique for artists who have a penchant for the serendipitous!


Images Highlighting The Sequence (And Successive Prints) Of The LRSP Technique On Cotton Using Foam Packaging Peanuts
Only three colors, green, blue and orange are used in the sequence of prints below.

Print A. Silk-screened using green fabric paint.

Print B. Silk-screened using blue fabric paint.
Note the melding of the blue with the initial green fabric colour.

Print C. Silk-screened using orange fabric paint.
Note the melding of the previous blue and green fabric colors with the orange.

Print D. Silk-screened using orange fabric paint.
Note the melding of the previous orange, blue and green fabric colors with this orange.

Print E: Silkscreened using blue fabric paint.
Note the melding of the previous two orange, blue and green fabric colors with the blue.


More Images Using Various Low Relief Items and Colors on Cotton
Note: These are just individual views (with detail views) and they are not a sequence of the one print.

LRSP employing fabric paints using found plastics and leaves.

Detail view of the above print employing fabric paints using found plastics and leaves.

LRSP employing fabric paints using ferns and grasses.

Detail view of the above print employing fabric paints using ferns and grasses

LRSP employing fabric paints using found plastics and leaves.

Detail view of the above print employing fabric paints using found plastics and leaves.

LRSP employing fabric paints using lace.

Detail view of the above print employing fabric paints using lace.

LRSP employing fabric paints using found plastics and leaves.

Detail view of the above print employing fabric paints using found plastics and leaves.

LRSP employing fabric paints using foam packaging peanuts.

Detail view of the above print employing fabric paints using foam-packaging peanuts.

Mono print taken from the foam packaging peanuts on the base print surface at the end of printing.