Saturday, January 22, 2011

Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing Workshop

Disperse Dyes - Five Day Workshop at the Wrapt in Rocky CQ Textile Forum

Tutor: Marie-Therese Wisniowski

Preamble
This blogspot exhibits many of my students outputs from a variety of workshops. There are one, two and five day workshops as well as workshops that have a different focus. Nevertheless, it always surprises me how much I learn from my students and how enthusiastic they are to learn and so for your convenience, I have listed the workshop posts below.

The University of Newcastle Multi-Media Course
The University of Newcastle (Newcastle and Ourimbah Campuses, NSW, Australia) 2008 to 2010.

One and Two Day Disperse Dye Workshops
Various Textile Groups (Australia) 2008 - 2011.

Five Day Workshop - In Pursuit of Complex Cloth
“Wrapt in Rocky” Textile Fibre Forum Conference (Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia) 29th June to 5th July 2008.

Five Day Workshop – In Pursuit of Complex Cloth
Orange Textile Fiber Forum (Orange, NSW, Australia) 19th to 25th April 2009.

5 Day Workshop – In Pursuit of Complex Cloth
Geelong Fiber Forum (Geelong, Victoria, Australia) 27th September to 3rd October 2009.

Two Day Workshop - Deconstructed and Polychromatic Screen Printing
Beautiful Silks (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia) 20th to 21st March 2010.

Two Day Workshop – Improvisational Screen Printing
ATASDA (Sydney, NSW, Australia) 28th to 29th August 2010.

Two Day Workshop – In Pursuit of Complex Cloth (Day One)
”Stitching and Beyond” Textile Group (Woodbridge, Tasmania, Australia) 2nd to 3rd October 2010.

Two Day Workshop – In Pursuit of Complex Cloth (Day Two)
”Stitching and Beyond” Textile Group (Woodbridge, Tasmania, Australia) 2nd to 3rd October 2010.

Advance Silk Screen Printing
Redcliffe City Art Gallery Redcliffe, Queensland, Australia) 10th April 2011.

One Day Workshop - In Pursuit of Complex Cloth
The Victorian Feltmakers Inc. (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia) 14th May 2011.

One Day Workshop - In Pursuit of Complex Cloth (Felted and Silk Fibers)
Victorian Feltmakers Inc (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia) 15th May 2011.

Five Day Workshop – Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
SDA (Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA) 13th to 17th June 2011.

Five Day Disperse Dye Master Class – Barbara Scott
Art Quill Studio (Arcadia Vale, NSW, Australia) 15th to 19th August 2011.

Five Day Workshop – Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
Fiber Arts Australia (Sydney, NSW, Australia) 26th September to 1st October 2011.

One Day Workshop – Improvisational Screen Printing
Newcastle Printmakers Workshop Inc. (Newcastle, NSW, Australia) 5th November 2011.

One Day Workshops – Low Relief Screen Printing
Various classes within Australia.

Two Day Workshop – Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
ATASDA (Sydney, NSW, Australia) 23rd to 24th June 2012.

MSDS Demonstration at Zijdelings
(Tilburg, The Netherlands) October, 2012.

Five Day Workshop - Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
Fibre Arts@Ballarat (Ballarat, Victoria, Australia) 6th to 12th April 2013.

Two Day Workshop - Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
EFTAG (Tuross Head, NSW, Australia) 13th to 14th April 2013.

Two Day Workshop - Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
Zijdelings Studio (Tilburg, The Netherlands) 9th to 10th October 2014.

PCA - Celebrating 50 Years in 2016
Art Quill Studio 2016 Workshop Program.

Image Dreamings: Basic Silk Screen Printing Workshop - Part I
2016 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).

Image Dreamings: Basic Silk Screen Printing Workshop - Part II
2016 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).

In Pursuit of: Improvisational Screen Printing Workshop
2016 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).

In Pursuit of: Low Relief Screen Printing (LRSP) Workshop

Art Quill Studio 2017 Workshop Program
2017 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).


Disperse Dye Information
This class of dyestuffs was developed for cellulose acetate around 1920 and was called “acetate dyes”. It did not get the name “disperse dyes’ until 1953 when the use of synthetic fabric increased. Commercial use of the transfer printing technique began in 1968 when transfer paper began being manufactured. Today many commercial textiles are printed using this technique.

Disperse dyes are not soluble in water but dissolve in the synthetic fiber. Penetration into the fiber is achieved by dyeing at a high temperature under pressure. Synthetic fabrics can only be dyed with disperse dyes. Today, disperse dyes are used to dye hydrophobic (water repelling) fabrics such as polyester, nylon, acrylic and acetate rayon. The transfer brands of disperse dyes are based on the ability of disperse dyes to sublimate. Under heat, they evaporate directly from solid state and move from one material to another. This reaction produces fastness properties that are permanent in synthetic fibres. Disperse dyes are lightfast, washfast and produce strong hues on synthetics. The dyes are transparent (printing a blue area over a yellow will produce green) and so lend themselves to layering and overprinting to build up rich and complex surfaces as well as create delicate and subtle imagery. The dyes can be intermixed to create your own suite of palette colors.


Transfer Printing
"In transfer printing, disperse dyes are first painted, screened, stamped, or stencilled on plain paper and dried. The paper is then placed face down against a synthetic fabric and dry heat is applied. The dye becomes a vapor, moves from the paper into the fabric and resolidifies. The print is deposited on only one side of the fabric leaving the other side the original colour. Transfer printing does not affect the hand of the fabric and is wash fast." (Holly Brackmann, The Surface Designer's Handbook, Interweave Press, 2006).

Five-Day Workshop Synopsis
This workshop was organized by the "Wrapt in Rocky" Central Queensland Textile Forum, Rockhampton, Queensland. It was held at the Rockhampton Girls Grammar School Campus as part of the 'Wrapt in Rocky' Biennial Textile Forum/Conference Program, 25th June - 1st July 2010.

Harmina Balch, Jan Collins, Chris Cooper, Sheree Dearden, Chris Evans, Vi Hall, Helen Kemp, Annette Sibson and Janet Williams attended the workshop.

The workshop participants created unique, one-of-a-kind ArtCloth fabrics of great depth and complexity employing the dye sublimation process using disperse dyes on polyester and synthetic fibres. A fun and exciting class where participants created their own custom dyed fabric using disperse dyes via direct imaging, experimental and layering exercises. They applied painted, textured, printed imagery onto papers with the dyes and then transfer printed them to polyester and blended synthetic fabrics to create a suite of colour and pattern studies via an iron or heat press.

The five-day workshop was an introduction to the dye sublimation process (transfer printing) which developed throughout the week long program. Participants were introduced to basic imaging processes and advanced to mastering highly complex multiple imaging and multiple overprinting relationships and techniques. One such technique they employed was the tutors signature flora technique which she has termed as “MultiSperse Dye Sublimation (MSDS)”. See participants outputs below.

Group Photo: From left to right: Harmina Balch, Chris Evans, Chris Cooper, Janet Williams, Helen Kemp, Jan Collins, Vi Hall, Annette Sibson.

Sheree Dearden.

Jan Collins (a) The tutors signature flora technique, MultiSperse Dye Sublimation (MSDS).

Jan Collins (b) MultiSperse Dye Sublimation (MSDS) technique.

Sheree Dearden (a) Texture, overprinting and colour study.

Sheree Dearden (b) Texture, overprinting, design and colour study.

Janet Williams (a) MultiSperse Dye Sublimation (MSDS) technique.

Janet Williams (b) MultiSperse Dye Sublimation (MSDS) technique.

Janet Williams (c) MultiSperse Dye Sublimation (MSDS) technique.

Chris Cooper (a) The tutors signature flora technique, MultiSperse Dye Sublimation (MSDS) employing low relief items.

Chris Cooper (b) MultiSperse Dye Sublimation (MSDS) technique.

Vi Hall (a) Texture, overprinting and colour study.

Vi Hall (b) MultiSperse Dye Sublimation (MSDS) technique.

Harmina Balch (a) MultiSperse Dye Sublimation (MSDS), multiple layering and overprinting employing resists, textures, colour washes and contrast colour study.

Harmina Balch (b) Detail View.
MultiSperse Dye Sublimation (MSDS), multiple layering and overprinting employing resists, textures, colour washes and contrast color study.

Harmina Balch (c) Resist, texture and color study on panne velvet.

Chris Evans (a) MultiSperse Dye Sublimation (MSDS) technique.

Chris Evans (b) Design study employing layered imagery and paper stencils on a gradated background.

Annette Sibson (a) MultiSperse Dye Sublimation (MSDS) technique in two panel format.

Annette Sibson (b) Detail View.
MultiSperse Dye Sublimation (MSDS) technique.

Helen Kemp (a) Depth study employing multiple resist and numerous overprinted layers.

Helen Kemp (b) MultiSperse Dye Sublimation (MSDS) technique.

3 comments:

marion webber said...

really beautiful effects

Art Quill Studio said...

Welcome to the Art Quill blog site Marion.
Thank you for your kind comment. So pleased to hear that you enjoyed the participants workshop images.

yvette dopheide said...

Love love love iT so much!
But artwork from your hands has always intruiged me....